Dangers of Indoor Air Pollutants at Home

When we hear about air pollution, almost (if not all) of us think of car emissions or the smog found in busy city streets. But that just refers to outdoor air pollution. Yes, you heard that right. We might all think that we’re safe from air pollutants when we’re inside the home. But there is such a thing as indoor air pollution or more specifically, household air pollution. As a matter of fact, it is possible for the air inside homes to be more seriously polluted than outside, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  Air pollution, whether indoor or outdoor, is obviously invisible and therefore can only be detected using special equipment and tests. And so because we spend more than half of our time inside our homes, we’ve got to better educate ourselves with the causes and effects of indoor air pollution.  To have an easier understanding on the dangers of indoor air pollution, we’ve categorized them into levels, 5 being the most serious:

When we hear about air pollution, almost (if not all) of us think of car emissions or the smog found in busy city streets. But that just refers to outdoor air pollution. Yes, you heard that right. We might all think that we’re safe from air pollutants when we’re inside the home. But there is such a thing as indoor air pollution or more specifically, household air pollution. As a matter of fact, it is possible for the air inside homes to be more seriously polluted than outside, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Air pollution, whether indoor or outdoor, is obviously invisible and therefore can only be detected using special equipment and tests. And so because we spend more than half of our time inside our homes, we’ve got to better educate ourselves with the causes and effects of indoor air pollution.

To have an easier understanding on the dangers of indoor air pollution, we’ve categorized them into levels, 5 being the most serious:

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Level 1:  Harmful Chemical Compounds

Airborne toxic compounds like formaldehyde, methylene chloride, acetone, benzene and toluene are the most common sources of indoor air pollution because they are released by most of our household products.

Many of the things we’re using actually cause pollutants to contaminate the air we breathe like all-purpose cleaners, floor waxes, pesticides, nail polish removers, varnishes, paints, and even air freshener sprays. When more concentrated, toxic compounds from these may cause dizziness, headaches, blurred vision, nausea, nose and throat infection, eye problems, and even lung cancer.


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Level 2:  Bacteria and Viruses

Your family members, pets, friends, and house guests may be sources of indoor pollutants as well-- by bringing in bacteria and viruses from outside.

Especially when your house doesn’t allow much outdoor air to enter and circulate, these bacteria and viruses get more concentrated, contaminating the air you breathe inside more. Good hygiene, clean practices at home, and better ventilation can prevent these indoor pollutants to cause common colds, influenza, tuberculosis, and other health hazards.


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Level 3:  Allergens

The use of high-quality air filters in homes is but necessary most especially when your household constantly uses heating and air conditioning systems.

Why? Because with a forced-air system (HVAC), irritants like tobacco smoke, dust and dust mites, pollen, pet dander, cockroaches, and other micro debris get widely distributed. Without mitigation, these indoor pollutants can cause allergies, respiratory ailments, eye infection, and sinus problems.


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Level 4:  Mold and Mildew

Mold and mildew infestation is usually found in damp environments, normally thriving in organic materials like paper, fabric, leather, and wood. However, they can also hide elsewhere-- in places where you don’t usually see.

Because of that, even if you say you’re sure your kitchen or bathroom is mold-free, you’re not 100% sure that the air you breathe is free from mold and mildew. A living mold colony produces microscopic spores that disperse quickly through the air. Once you and your family members inhale these tiny organisms, you may experience nose and/or throat irritation, asthma, lung infections, and more.


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Level 5:  Dangerous Gases

Hazardous gases like carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and radon are even more dangerous to our health because they’re invisible and odorless.

Carbon monoxide and nitrogen and sulfur dioxides are released mostly by fuel-burning stoves, heaters, ovens, and other home appliances. While radon (radioactive gas) can enter your home through cracks in your basement, walls, drains, and crawl spaces. Exposure to these gases cause eye irritation, serious respiratory infection, pulmonary diseases, and death from lung cancer.


While it is always recommended to keep your home clean and get regular mitigation services, it is also best that you rely on an efficient tool that’ll keep your home free from these indoor pollutants 24/7 even without your help-- just like our Bamboo Charcoal Air Purifiers! Keep these in and around your home, in every nook and cranny, to protect your family from allergens, mold & mildew, air-borne bacteria, viruses, and bad odors!